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Ministries for Life Transitions

Our Life transitions Team provides educational forums several times a year on Sundays From 12:15pm-1:30pm in the Great Hall. Lunch is provided.

Topics include aspects of Creative Aging, Chronic Illness and Caregiving. For further study, see resources below. Contact Rev. Drema McAllister-Wilson

Creative Aging

For Further Study:
Bankson, Marjory Zoet, Creative Aging: Rethinking Retirement and Non-retirement in a Changing World (Skylight Paths Publishing), 2011
Bateson, Mary Catherine, Composing a Further Life: The Age of Active Wisdom (Knopf) September, 2010
Nelson, John E. and Bolles, Richard N., What Color Is Your Parachute? For Retirement, Second Edition: Planning a Prosperous, Healthy, and Happy Future (Ten Speed Press, Random House) 2010
Raines, Robert, A Time to Live: Seven Tasks of Creative Aging (Plume) 1997
Trafford, Abigail, My Time: Making the Most of the Bonus Decades After Fifty, 2004 

Chronic Illness and Caregiving

Web Resources:

Organizations

  • Area Chronic Disease Self-Management Program Workshops: MD (Montgomery County), Kristen Wheeden, Holy Cross Health, 301-461-9881; MD, VA, DC, Lisa Carpenter, Kaiser, 301-816-5776,  (workshops offered wherever they have medical centers)
  • DC Department of Health, Joni Eisenberg, 202-442-5925  

For Further Study:

Coping with a Serious Illness

  • Huegel, Kelly, Young People and Chronic Illness: True Stories, Help and Hope. True stories about teens with asthma, diabetes, lupus, hemophilia, Crohn’s disease, and epilepsy and strategies for how to cope with chronic illness. (Free Spirit Publishing) 1998
  • Mace, Nancy L. and Rabins, Peter V., The 36-Hour Day: A Family Guide to Caring for People Who Have Alzheimer Disease, Related Dementias, and Memory 2012
  • Droege, Thomas, With Open Arms: Receiving Care with Grace and Gratitude 2005
  • Byock, Ira, M.D., The Best Care Possible: A Physician's Quest to Transform Care through the End of Life (Penguin Group) 2013

Support for Caregivers

  • Langshur, Eric and Sharon, We Carry Each Other: Getting Through Life's Toughest Times. Founders of CarePages. (Conari Press) 2007
  • Pogrebin, Letty Cottin, How To Be a Friend to a Friend Who’s Sick (Public Affairs, Perseus Books Group) 2013
  • Sheehy, Gail, Passages in Caregiving: Turning Chaos into Confidence (HarperCollins) 2011

Spiritual Support

  • Umbreit, Alexa and Mark, Pathways To Spirituality and Healing: Embracing Life and Each Other in the Face of a Serious Illness (Fairview Press) 2002
  • Fulljames, Michael and Harper, Michael, Prayers for Healing (Canterbury) 2004
  • Bauer-Wu, Susan, Leaves Falling Gently: Living Fully with Serious and Life-Limiting Illness through Mindfulness, Compassion, and Connectedness (New Harbinger Publications) 201


End of Life/Bereavement

The Mourner’s Bill of Rights

  1. You have the right to experience your own unique grief.
  2. You have the right to talk about your grief.
  3. You have the right to feel a multitude of emotions
  4. You have the right to be tolerant of your physical and emotional limits
  5. You have the right to experience “griefbursts”.
  6. You have the right to make use of ritual.
  7. You have the right to embrace your spirituality.
  8. You have the right to search for meaning.
  9. You have the right to treasure your memories
  10. You have the right to move toward your grief and healing

Organizations

For Further Study

End of Life

  • Lynn, Joanne, MD, Handbook for Mortals: Guidance for People Facing Serious Illness
  • Byock, Ira, MD, Dying Well (Riverhead Books, Penguin Putnam) 1997
  • “The Go Wish Game: Decide What’s Important, Together,” www.codaaalliance.org

Bereavement

  • Hickman, Martha Whitmore, Healing After Loss - Daily Meditations for Working Through Grief
  • Lewis, Clive Staples, A Grief Observed (HarperOne) 2009
  • Tatelbaum, Judy, The Courage to Grieve - The Classic Guide to Creative Living, Recovery and Growth Through Grief, 2008

Walking the Labyrinth

Take time for reflection. Labyrinths are simple: you follow a single path to the center and back out. Unlike a maze, there are no decisions - leaving you free to focus on inner thoughts

Nearby labyrinths:


 [1] Transitions: Making Sense of Life’s Changes, Cambridge, MA: Da Capo Press, 2nd ed. 2004.